vitalism

"animism" has been applied to many different philosophical systems. It is used to describe Aristotle's view of the relation of soul and body held also by the stoics and scholastics. On the other hand monadology (Leibniz) has also been termed animistic. The name is most commonly applied to vitalism, which makes life, or life and mind, the directive principle in evolution and growth, holding that life is not merely mechanical but that there is a directive force which guides energy without altering its amount. An entirely different class of ideas, also termed animistic, is the belief in the world soul, held by Plato, Schelling and others. Lastly, in discussions of religion, "animism" refers to the belief in indwelling souls or spirits, particularly so-called "primitive" religions which consider everything to be inhabited by spirits.

Mini philosophy glossary . 2014.

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  • vitalism — VITALÍSM s.n. Curent în biologie, opus atât materialismului cât şi spiritualismului, care explică procesele de viaţă prin prezenţa în organismul viu a unui principiu imaterial şi incognoscibil, căruia îi sub subordonate toate procesele fizico… …   Dicționar Român

  • Vitalism — Vi tal*ism, n. (Biol.) The doctrine that all the functions of a living organism are due to an unknown vital principle distinct from all chemical and physical forces. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • vitalism — [vīt′ liz΄əm] n. [Fr vitalisme] the doctrine that the life in living organisms is caused and sustained by a vital force that is distinct from all physical and chemical forces and that life is, in part, self determining and self evolving vitalist… …   English World dictionary

  • Vitalism — This article is about the non mechanist philosophy. For other uses, see vital (disambiguation). Vitalism, as defined by the Merriam Webster dictionary,[1] is a doctrine that the functions of a living organism are due to a vital principle distinct …   Wikipedia

  • vitalism — The doctrine that there is some feature of living bodies that prevents their nature being entirely explained in physical or chemical terms. This feature may be the presence of a further ‘thing’ (such as a soul), but it may also be simply the… …   Philosophy dictionary

  • vitalism — vitalist, n., adj. vitalistic, adj. vitalistically, adv. /vuyt l iz euhm/ 1. the doctrine that phenomena are only partly controlled by mechanical forces, and are in some measure self determining. Cf. dynamism (def. 1), mechanism (def. 8) …   Universalium

  • vitalism — noun Date: 1822 1. a doctrine that the functions of a living organism are due to a vital principle distinct from physicochemical forces 2. a doctrine that the processes of life are not explicable by the laws of physics and chemistry alone and… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • vitalism — noun the doctrine that life involves some immaterial vital force , and cannot be explained scientifically …   Wiktionary

  • vitalism — The theory that animal functions are dependent upon a special form of energy or force, the vital force, distinct from the physical forces. SYN: vis vitae, vis vitalis. [L. vitalis, pertaining to life] * * * vi·tal·ism vīt əl .iz əm n …   Medical dictionary

  • vitalísm — s. n …   Romanian orthography

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